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Thread: Dairy protests

  1. #121
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    Re: Dairy protests

    From Wiki...

    In the UK, Anchor block butter was imported from New Zealand until August 2012 when Arla Foods UK, the British licencee, had just controversially transferred production to a local factory at Westbury[disambiguation needed] using British cream which substantially altered the taste of the butter.[6]
    There are more engines killed through lack of water than through lack of oil

  2. #122

    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Courier View Post
    From Wiki...

    In the UK, Anchor block butter was imported from New Zealand until August 2012 when Arla Foods UK, the British licencee, had just controversially transferred production to a local factory at Westbury[disambiguation needed] using British cream which substantially altered the taste of the butter.[6]
    Except that Arla spent a lot of work making sure the UK product looked and tasted the same! I think there maybe a sour Kiwi or placebo effect in there. All anchor butter and cheese available in UK is made in the UK.

  3. #123
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Farmer on a bike View Post
    Except that Arla spent a lot of work making sure the UK product looked and tasted the same! I think there maybe a sour Kiwi or placebo effect in there. All anchor butter and cheese available in UK is made in the UK.
    Yet many still assosciate Anchor with NZ (in a positive way)
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  4. #124
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

  5. #125
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    Re: Dairy protests

    I have had a little correspondence with a Farming Today producer regarding Sean Rickard.

    On one farming today programme Sean Rickard said "Tough, the dairy farmer is in the marketplace, why should he be helped, in any case the dairy farmer gets an average 28,000 SFP"
    About three or four days later a dairy farmer said he got 12,000, and I believe he said he had 200 cows.

    What would the average herd size be? What would the average payment to a dairy farmer be?

    The producer said that Sean Rickard was a knowledgeable and a reliable commentator.

    Just wondered.

    Jack Caley

  6. #126
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    Re: Dairy protests

    When SFP was brought in we were all told that it was NOT there to subsidise production -
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  7. #127
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack_Caley View Post
    I have had a little correspondence with a Farming Today producer regarding Sean Rickard.

    On one farming today programme Sean Rickard said "Tough, the dairy farmer is in the marketplace, why should he be helped, in any case the dairy farmer gets an average 28,000 SFP"
    About three or four days later a dairy farmer said he got 12,000, and I believe he said he had 200 cows.

    What would the average herd size be? What would the average payment to a dairy farmer be?

    The producer said that Sean Rickard was a knowledgeable and a reliable commentator.

    Just wondered.

    Jack Caley
    IIRC. When SPS was first brought in your 'entitlements' were based on historic information & built up from previous historic claims for Arable Aid, Slaughter Premium, Suckler Cow, Sheep Premium, Beef Special Premium, Bull Premium, etc claims.

    If you can imagine a bog standard dairy farm would have very few claims for any of the above.
    For the reference years of 2000, 2001, 2002 we had 11 Bull Premium & 93 Slaughter Premium claims ... which came to very little 'entitlement'.
    A Dairy Premium was then included, based on quota held on March 31st 2005 (that one & only date!)

    In the early years the 'historic entitlements' formed the majority of your payment & over the years had less inflence - there was a chart that showed this but I can't find it now - so SPS claims for dairy farmers slowly increased over the years until 'historic entitlements' no longer influenced the level of payments.
    Farmers with initially large historic payments - from lots of arable &/or sheep premium claims, for example - would see their SPS fall year on year ... down to the same payment per hectare level for all.

    This of course was in the 'early days' & BPS payments are now fairer, but it wasn't for those 9 (?) years of SPS & SFP.

    BPS payments now are based on hectares but in truth purely dairy farms aren't really massive.

  8. #128
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam_TM View Post
    IIRC. When SPS was first brought in your 'entitlements' were based on historic information & built up from previous historic claims for Arable Aid, Slaughter Premium, Suckler Cow, Sheep Premium, Beef Special Premium, Bull Premium, etc claims.

    If you can imagine a bog standard dairy farm would have very few claims for any of the above.
    For the reference years of 2000, 2001, 2002 we had 11 Bull Premium & 93 Slaughter Premium claims ... which came to very little 'entitlement'.
    A Dairy Premium was then included, based on quota held on March 31st 2005 (that one & only date!)

    In the early years the 'historic entitlements' formed the majority of your payment & over the years had less inflence - there was a chart that showed this but I can't find it now - so SPS claims for dairy farmers slowly increased over the years until 'historic entitlements' no longer influenced the level of payments.
    Farmers with initially large historic payments - from lots of arable &/or sheep premium claims, for example - would see their SPS fall year on year ... down to the same payment per hectare level for all.

    This of course was in the 'early days' & BPS payments are now fairer, but it wasn't for those 9 (?) years of SPS & SFP.

    BPS payments now are based on hectares but in truth purely dairy farms aren't really massive.
    Thank you for that Sam, however it does not really help me in any discussion with the BBC producer. My point with him was that Sean Rickard had used distorted figures (I presume including all the payments , huge estates, British Sugar etc), in order to emphasize his usual agenda.
    I suppose it could be worked out from the total number of dairy farmers , but what I was wanting was the BPS payment to an average dairy farmer whose business revolved solely around his milk production.
    It is all very well to say "tough, you know the risks as my local MP said, but the dairy farmer surely has the right to fight for reasonable prices so his business can survive. We all know that farmers are price takers not price makers but they were denied the possibility of marketing cooperatively, what can they do?
    Any figures, even confidentially by Private message would be appreciated,

    Jack Caley

  9. #129
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack_Caley View Post
    It is all very well to say "tough, you know the risks as my local MP said, but the dairy farmer surely has the right to fight for reasonable prices so his business can survive. We all know that farmers are price takers not price makers but they were denied the possibility of marketing cooperatively, what can they do?
    Any figures, even confidentially by Private message would be appreciated,

    Jack Caley
    Jack
    There are several co-ops in the UK and Arla, a very successful European co-op operates in the UK. Why do you think farmers are denied the possibility of marketing co-operatively when that opportunity is already there.

  10. #130
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Stewart View Post
    Jack
    There are several co-ops in the UK and Arla, a very successful European co-op operates in the UK. Why do you think farmers are denied the possibility of marketing co-operatively when that opportunity is already there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Courier View Post
    In 1980 a group of farmers in West Yorkshire did indeed attempt to form a co-operative to sell their own milk (Hilldale Farms Dairy) and very successful they were at it too - they were ultimately hounded out of existence by henchmen from top heavy MMB.

    Arla and FrieslandCampina were already well on the way to becoming mega co-ops by the time the UK stopped hounding those who were prepared to look out for themselves.
    The very size of the now existing coops which operate within the UK - The time to create a "Fonterra UK" is long gone due to past government actions.
    There are more engines killed through lack of water than through lack of oil

  11. #131
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    Re: Dairy protests

    Quote Originally Posted by Courier View Post
    The very size of the now existing coops which operate within the UK - The time to create a "Fonterra UK" is long gone due to past government actions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Courier View Post
    In 1980 a group of farmers in West Yorkshire did indeed attempt to form a co-operative to sell their own milk (Hilldale Farms Dairy) and very successful they were at it too - they were ultimately hounded out of existence by henchmen from top heavy MMB.

    Arla and FrieslandCampina were already well on the way to becoming mega co-ops by the time the UK stopped hounding those who were prepared to look out for themselves.
    You may not be able to create a Fonterra UK or even need one, the smaller NZ co-ops generally out perform Fonterra.

    If Hillsdale farms was formed during the regime of the MMB they would have been liable to pay Producer Processor levy, if the levy is unpaid then the henchmen from the MMB would coming knocking on the door.

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